Ponderosa Lemon Marmalade

Hard to believe this tiny tree created this enormous lemon

Hard to believe this tiny tree created this enormous lemon

My tiny Ponderosa Lemon tree has put forth enormous effort and borne one lemon.  Being a Ponderosa, this lemon is quite large, about the same as two regular lemons.  What to do with one lemon, to do honor to the effort put forth by my little tree?  I decided to make lemon marmalade.  I don’t like to use artificial jelling agents, so I do it the old-fashioned way with just lemon, sugar and water.  In case you have not been rewarded with one lone lemon, I will give the recipe as written, for regular lemon marmalade.  I adjusted the amounts, using a calculator, to make the correct proportions for my lemon.  This recipe is adapted from one in The Australian Woman’s Weekly “The Book of Preserves.”

Tangy Lemon Marmalade

    • 6 medium lemons
    • 7 cups of water
    • 4 cups sugar
Cut rind thinly from lemons, slice finely. Cut pith from lemons, chop roughly.  Cut flesh into thin slices reserving seeds.  Put pith and seeds in a muslin bag or similar container (to keep them separate from the rind and flesh).  Place rind, flesh and water in a large bowl with muslin bag of pith and seeds and let sit overnight to soften the rind.

This is the cheesecloth bag containing the pith and seeds that has soaked in the juices overnight.

This is the cheesecloth bag containing the pith and seeds that has soaked in the juices overnight.

Remove muslin bag in the morning to avoid letting too much of the bitter seed flavor to infiltrate the jam.  Put rind, water and flesh mixture in a large pan and simmer covered for 40 minutes until rind is soft.  Stir in sugar over heat (without boiling) until dissolved.  Bring to a boil and boil until the marmalade jells when tested.  Put finished marmalade into sterilized jars and seal.  I usually can the sealed jars in an open kettle for five minutes to assure myself of the seal but this is not necessary if the seal seems secure.  You can tell if you have a good seal by the vacuum created when the jar has cooled.  After it has completely cooled, the center of the lid will have pulled down.  The ring can safely be removed at this point.  If you make this recipe with the normal number of lemons, you get about 6 cups.
How to test when it is ready??  I use two tests; the cold plate test and the double drip test.  Put a small plate in the freezer when you start to cook the jam.  When the jam sheets off the spoon into double drips, then take out the plate, let a few drops fall onto the plate, wait a minute to let them cool and try pushing the drop with your fingertip.  If it piles up or wrinkles, it is ready.
Here you can see the "double drop" which is another indication the you have cooked it long enough.

Here you can see the “double drop” which is another indication the you have cooked it long enough.

This is how the marmalade looks when it is done.  The drop wrinkles slightly.

This is how the marmalade looks when it is done. The drop wrinkles slightly.

Finished product.  Only one jar for each Ponderosa Lemon.

Finished product. Only one jar for each Ponderosa Lemon.

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1 Response so far »

  1. 1

    […] marmalade I usually make.  [I have previously posted the directions for Ponderosa Lemon Marmalade here .]  I first encountered Lemon Curd on a birding trip to the Cornwall area of England.  It is a […]

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