Archive for Medicating red fox for mange

Fox Update-Final

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I’ve decided that our fox is cured of mange. Here’s the fox getting the hot dog and looking just as fluffy as the other fox with the exception of the tip of its tail.  I’ve decided that it is probably permanently damaged.  I ended up successfully administering six doses of Ivermectin, falling between the veterinarian’s recommended three doses and the eight doses recommended by a British Fox Preservation Association on line.  I’ll continue putting out hot dogs for a while at least.

Here’s my first shot of our mangy fox taken on September 20th.  I feel so good!

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Fox Update #7

Well, last night was the night for the 6th dose.  As you can see, a fox got the hot dog (left), but not the fox I wanted to get the hot dog (right).  This does, however, give me a useful comparison for how far “my” fox needs to go before he is truly recovered.  I’m beginning to wonder if the end of his tail is permanently damaged as it’s still just the bony end I see.  He is looking a lot better now.  I thought of him in his den, snugly wrapped in his new tail during these past two frigid nights.  I’ll try again tonight with the medication.  If the other fox has any mange, I suppose it’s a good thing he got the dose.

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Fox Update #5

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Here is the fox getting the fourth dose of Ivermectin and looking ever so much better.  My issue now is whether or not to buy another package of hot dogs to keep going on the dosage every ten days.  I have five left from the latest package but it is a challenge to get the hot dog to the fox with all the other critters that have discovered the nightly bounty.  We now have an extremely healthy looking cat coming regularly in addition to the rats and raccoons.  On first glance I thought this might be another fox because of the bushy tail but the coloration is wrong.

I’m not sure what to do.  The way mange works is that the adults lay the eggs under the skin and eggs hatch out in about 10 days. The Ivermectin taken by mouth apparently kills only the adults.  This is why you wait and give the medication at 10 to 14 day intervals, so all the egg stages are killed.  I just don’t know if I’ve killed all the adults and there are no remaining eggs to hatch.

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