Archive for Uncategorized

Strategy for the Timely Planting of Peas?

IMG_5470

I have always planted my peas on st. Patrick’s Day (a green activity for a green day) but this year, with three Nor’easters in March, one due tomorrow and yet another forecast for next week, the wisdom of this habit seems ill advised.  Peas are a crop that require cool weather to bear well and usually give up when the hot weather arrives here in Connecticut, usually mid-June.  If I wait too long to get them planted I’ll lose out on this lovely vegetable entirely.  I plant snow peas and we’d certainly miss out on the beautiful healthy stir fry dishes we anticipate for spring.  Well, THAT would be terrible so I’m taking a gamble.  I planted them on St. Patrick’s Day in a snow free spot in the garden, watered them and covered them with a portable cold frame a friend found for me at Costco.  The sun has warmed the soil enough to keep the ground from freezing at night.  It remains to be seen if the little cold frame can withstand the weight of 8 to 12″ of snow/”wintery mix” forecast for tomorrow.  Stay tuned!

Advertisements

Comments (3) »

Happy Valentine’s Day!

These are the Valentines I made for our Grandchildren.  I thought I’d try pop-up cards and had such fun with them.  Julia loves Origami so gave her a butterfly for the cover and made her a flight of doves for the inside.  This gave me some ideas for adding color to the background, etc.

 

Comments (1) »

Pete’s Tree: Native Plant Success

 

Pagoda, cropped

This Catbird is one of the several species enjoying the early season fruit from the Pagoda Dogwood

I have championed native plants here previously, especially deer resistant bird friendly ones and I now have another success.  My sister-in-law wanted to do something as a memorial to our son Pete after his death from cancer in 2013 and we decided on a Pagoda Dogwood.  In only three years it has borne a bumper crop of fruit and is covered with birds each morning, especially Gray Catbirds, Northern Mocking Birds, American Robins and Cedar Waxwings.  This tree has early season fruit, a much sought after food source for birds.  We planted it near the bird bath where it would have the moist soil it enjoys.  It has so much going for it; early fruit, deer resistance, spring flowers, fall color and it’s native to this area.  I know Pete is enjoying the bird show.

IMG_4725

Here’s what it looks like in the spring.

Leave a comment »

Strawberries!!!

IMG_5253

On Friday my husband and I picked 25+ pounds of strawberries at a local farm.  They were daunting when I got them home.  Of course we wanted jam and I like an old recipe from colonial days.  The New England colonists brought with them Sweet Woodruff, an herb native to Europe, where it was a necessary ingredient in their May wine but they also put it in strawberry jam as a flavor enhancer.  I made 12 jars of Strawberry-Sweet Woodruff jam and 14 jars of Strawberry-Pineapple.

IMG_5275

They’re the reddish ones in the middle

The farm gives out free recipe sheets and there was a recipe for a strawberry/pasta/kale salad which intrigued me but when I tried it we found it underwhelming.  I thought it had promise though so I tried it again, making it a whole meal this time using chicken chunks, quinoa, kale, strawberries and roasted sunflower seeds.  We really enjoyed it.  I used a sweet & sour lemony vinaigrette and garnished it with the zest from the lemon.

IMG_5272

And then there were the other uses:

IMG_5261

On cereal

IMG_5254

Strawberries and cream with a sprinkling of sugar

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_5256

Strawberries give me a chance to use my beloved old Royal Doulton berry plate that I found at a flea market with my brother. The bowl is perforated on the bottom so the berries don’t get soggy.

I also made a fresh strawberry pie, too sloppy to show you.  It’s been very rainy here and I should have used more cornstarch as it’s more like a thick sauce and spreads all over the plate (but still tasty).

 

default

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (4) »

Lady Jane is Always the First to Bloom

IMG_5206

I always summer my Amaryllis bulbs in the garden and rest them for a couple of months in the fall.  I bring them up into the sunlight in late January to have some beauty in the cold days of winter.  I’ve had Lady Jane at least 20 years.  Happy Spring!!  [Click here for a link for full instructions that I posted earlier.]

Comments (5) »

Happy Pi Day!!

IMG_5203

In celebration of Pi Day, 3/14, I made this raspberry pie from berries we picked last fall.  Yum!!

Comments (4) »

Lemon-Ginger Rhubarb: A Pie for Summer

IMG_4915

In spring strawberry/rhubarb pie is one of my all time favorites but once hot weather sets in, the strawberries have gone by.  I still have lots of rhubarb and decided to make this pie which I’ve adapted from a friend’s recipe.  It requires an oven but I can bake in my toaster oven so it doesn’t heat up the house too much.  The lemon and ginger give it a refreshing flavor, nice with a tall glass of iced tea on a hot afternoon.

Lemon-Ginger Rhubarb Pie

  • Pastry for 2-9″ pie crusts [I use Pillsbury roll outs but don’t tell anyone!]
  • 3 1/2 C diced rhubarb
  • 1 C sugar
  • 1 Tbsp. AP flour
  • 1 lightly beaten egg
  • 1 Tbsp grated lemon zest
  • 1 tsp. grated ginger root (or ginger paste), or to taste
  • 1/2 C water
  • 1 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 Tbsp. butter

Preheat oven to 425º.  Spread diced rhubarb evenly in a pastry lined 9″ pie pan.  Using a double boiler (or being extremely cautious using a regular saucepan), blend sugar and flour then stir in the remaining ingredients, stirring constantly over low heat until smooth and somewhat thickened.  Pour over the rhubarb and cover with top crust.  I like to make a lattice crust and sprinkle crystallized sugar on it for this one.  Bake 30 minutes.  Protect edges if they brown too soon.

 

 

Comments (1) »

%d bloggers like this: