Posts tagged saving Amaryllis bulbs

Lady Jane is Always the First to Bloom

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I always summer my Amaryllis bulbs in the garden and rest them for a couple of months in the fall.  I bring them up into the sunlight in late January to have some beauty in the cold days of winter.  I’ve had Lady Jane at least 20 years.  Happy Spring!!  [Click here for a link for full instructions that I posted earlier.]

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Pot some Amaryllis to get Spring Brilliance on your Windowsill

Here are a few of the dozen or so pots of amaryllis that brighten our winter days.  With minimal effort, you can do this too.

Here are a few of the dozen or so pots of amaryllis that brighten our winter days. With minimal effort, you can do this too.

We had a mild frost a week back, enough to soften the leaves on the Amaryllis I had put out into the garden for the summer.   I cut the foliage back to the about an inch above the bulb and gently removed any dead papery skin from the bulb.

here are the amaryllis I have saved and enjoyed year after year.  After a light frost the foliage is soft and ready for trimming.

Here are the amaryllis I have saved and enjoyed year after year. After a light frost the foliage is soft and ready for trimming.

This is the stage that I like to dig them up and repot them to move them back indoors for the winter.  I mix the soil with a tablespoon of organic bone meal per pot and repot the bulbs so that the top half is showing above the soil.

the foliage is trimmed and the bulb repotted.  They get bigger every year.  This one needs a 12" pot now.

The foliage is trimmed and the bulb repotted. They get bigger every year. This one needs a 12″ pot now.

I water them and put them in the cellar in a cool dark spot where they rest for about 8 weeks.  I check them every so often to see if they need a little water as they shouldn’t dry out completely.  Bring any that begin to sprout up into the sun and warmth.  Once they begin to open, move them to a cooler spot out of the sun to enjoy the flowers longer.  If they haven’t sprouted after 10 weeks or so, bring them into the light to speed them up.  Replant them into the garden or set the pot outside and water and fertilize well when all threat of frost is past in the spring.

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